Supermarkets

Nori- Seaweed snacks – TJ

Just a few pieces of these seaweed snacks works very well for the Zuna base (recipe in The Foodie Bar Way). Once opened, they will go from light and crispy, to soft and “stale” – quickly… so once opened, we immediately put the package into a quart size top freezer...

Kiwi (organic) – TJ

Whenever I make a trip to Trader Joe’s, I buy a bag of kiwi! I also buy them at our local supermarket and sometimes at Costco (4 pound package). Let ripen on the counter. When the kiwi begins to soften (each may ripen at a different time, so check them each day), put it into the fridge (if you don’t eat it right...

Sugar Snap Peas – TJ

Sugar Snap Peas that are ready to pop into your mouth can be found in the produce aisle of local supermarkets and at Trader Joe’s. They are perfect for dipping into one of my hummus, dressing or guacamole recipes in The Foodie Bar Way...

Apples – (organic) – TJ

I get bagged organic apples and pears when I am at Trader Joe’s. They typically have several different varieties of...

Berries – Fresh – (organic) – TJ

I almost always buy frozen berries, but if you want to sprinkle them on Dessert Nachos (recipe on www.TheNutritionProfessor.com and in The Foodie Bar Way cookbook), Trader Joe’s sells...

Celery – (organic) – TJ

Trader Joe’s sells organic celery in the refrigerated produce area. I buy organic celery because it is on the “dirty dozen” list.

Zucchini – (organic) – TJ

Trader Joe’s sells organic zucchini (also known as summer squash) on a consistent basis, and I find it tends to be less expensive than at the supermarket/grocery store. Some of the zucchini (as well as some sweet corn and papaya*) grown in the US is from genetically engineered (GE) seeds. If you want to avoid this, buy organic. *All commercial production of GE papayas is in Hawaii. However, most of the papayas sold in the continental United States are imported from Brazil, Mexico, and the Caribbean (and not genetically engineered)....

Sugar Snap Peas

I eat these right out of the package, just as they are or dipped into one of my dressings, hummus, guacamole, salsa featured at www.TheNutritionProfessor.com or in the my book – The Foodie Bar...

Potatoes – Get Colorful!

These colorful potatoes are perfect for steaming and having on hand to sprinkle with mesquite, Cajun or taco seasoning, or dip into hummus, mustard, your favorite oil free dressing (many recipes and even 2 Dressing Foodie Bars can be found in The Foodie Bar...

Sunflower Seeds

I use raw sunflower seeds in a variety of dressings and sauces and recommend them in place of nuts (for those with nut allergy). They are sold in bags (great price at Trader Joe’s) and in bulk (supermarket). I keep them in the...

Japanese Eggplant

I absolutely LOVE Japanese eggplant! They are easy to slice in to planks, rounds or even just in half, lengthwise. I like to grill or roast them, (Fajita Grilled Veggies or Mediterranean Grilled Veggies – both recipes in The Foodie Bar Way). I also broil them with a miso-based marinade. Have fun with these purple...

Almond milk (shelf-stable/aseptic packaging)

Most of the nut milks can be purchased in shelf-stable/aseptic boxes on the supermarket shelves (refrigerate after opening), or in more “traditional” cartons in the refrigerated section (dairy aisle or natural foods refrigerator case).

Apples (organic whenever possible)

Apples tend to be heavily sprayed, so whenever possible, buy organic! I tend to buy them in 3 pound bags at the grocery store or Trader Joe’s (or 5.5 pound plastic containers at Costco – when they have organic varieties). I keep them in the refrigerator (in the lowest crisper...

Apple Sauce – (organic)

Since conventionally grown apples are heavily sprayed, whenever I buy apple sauce for recipes, I look for organic (store brand is fine).  

Arrowroot powder/starch

Arrowroot powder can be used in place of cornstarch in recipes and has the advantage of being non-GMO (unlike most cornstarch), suitable for people with a corn allergy and extracted from the arrowroot without use of harsh chemicals. I keep a large bag of arrowroot in the freezer. Arrowroot tends to survive freezing better than cornstarch, and work well in acidic liquids (sauces, tomato based soups), but may break down after prolonged cooking/high heat. Available at most grocery stores in the specialty flour/baking area, but most reasonably priced when purchased...

Artichoke Hearts

While most people are familiar with marinated artichoke hearts in oil/vinegar, water packed artichoke hearts are also available in jars and cans.  

Baking Powder (Aluminum-Free)

Always choose Baking Powder market “Aluminum-Free” – it is typically sold right next to the baking powder with aluminum. We need reduce exposure to aluminum in our diet to protect our brain tissue (aluminum has been found in the brains of those suffering from Alzheimer’s...

Barley Flakes

For a variation on oatmeal, try barley flakes! I most often find them in the bulk section of the supermarket or natural food co-op.

BBQ Sauce

When purchasing BBQ sauce, look for one that does not contain High Fructose Corn Syrup or artificial sweeteners. Also, tomato puree should be the first ingredient! Then, you can compare sodium levels if you are trying to decide between a few choices. I will be sure to put a homemade BBQ sauce in the next book! Let me know if you have a great...

Beans – canned

When shopping for canned beans, be sure to look for those marked “BPA free” – though it is probably best to cook beans from dry when you can! I have found that organic varieties of canned beans are packed in much less sodium (85 mg/svg vs 440...

Chili Beans

Although the sodium is a bit high on this product, it is an occasional (treat) – and makes a yummy topping for our Southwestern Loaded Potato when we don’t have any of my Seasoned Black Beans on hand (recipes in The Foodie Bar Way). Look for the 50% Less Sodium version (S &...

Beans – Dry

My favorite dry beans are grown right here in Northern California by Chip and Bobbie Morris (Elegant Beans and Beyond). These heirloom beans are available at our Raley’s, Bel Air and Nob Hill stores, as well as...

Bouillon Base (to make veggie broth)

I love this Better Than Bouillon Base to make veggie broth. While it can be purchased at grocery stores, larger jars were being sold at Costco. Look carefully at the label, you want the jar marked Organic Reduced Sodium Seasoned Vegetable Base. Once opened, store in the refrigerator (will stay good for months and months, especially if you are careful to use only clean utensils). 1 tsp of this paste can be added to 1 cup of water to make 1 cup of veggie broth. The flavor is excellent and I love to use it in many recipes, including Mia’s Garlic Trees (in The Foodie Bar Way or on my website...

Bread – (Bagels) – sprouted

While bagels are typically nothing more than “empty calories” – it is possible to track down whole grain (and even sprouted grain) bagels. Like most bread products (especially those without preservatives), they will tend to mold quickly at room temperature, so I cut them in half, wrap them and plastic wrap (to reduce freezer burn), then pop them back into the bag and into the freezer they...

Breadcrumbs – Whole Grain – Panko

Panko style bread crumbs create a crunchy texture when used as a coating for roasted veggies or tofu. Look closely at the ingredients, some have hydrogenated fat/oil, an ingredient you most certainly want to avoid (links to health problems from infertility to heart disease). Whole grain products last longer when kept in the freezer (now you know why my upright freezer in the garage was such a smart investment that has paid for itself over and...

Bread – Whole Grain – Dave’s Killer Bread

My family LOVES this bread! When we first started purchasing it, I was thrilled, as it was 100% organic, 100% whole grain, 100% free of any animal products, and they used fruit as a sweetener. It is now available at Costco (production shot through the roof) and it looks like they have changed their recipe a bit, to include organic evaporated cane juice. This is a fantastic bread to start with, especially if you are not used to eating whole grain breads! Store it in the freezer and take out a piece or two a few minutes before you are ready to make a sandwich or toast...

Bread – Sprouted Varieties

There are a whole bunch of options for whole grain sprouted breads. Sprouted grains are typically higher in nutrients and tend to be digested more easily. Keep them all in the...

Rice – Brown Basmati and Long Grain

If you supermarket has a bulk section, look for different varieties of brown rice, including Basmati and long grain. I like storing my brown rice in… the freezer, of course! You can also buy brown rice in bags (supermarket, Trader Joe’s, etc.).

Rice- Brown – Short Grain

Short grain brown rice will yield a more sticky/chewy product – which is similar to the “white sticky rice” many of my students grew up eating. I use  short grain brown rice when setting up my Un-Fried Rice Foodie Bar and for homemade sushi (black sticky rice is fun, too!). I keep all of my whole grains (including rice) in the...

Rice – Brown – Boil-in-Bag

For those of you new to cooking brown rice, there are many options for cooking brown rice – including buying a “boil-in-bag” variety. This is partially pre-cooked so it will be done in ~10 minutes. You put the entire bag into a pot of boiling water (do not open the bag until it is cooked and you are ready to serve it. It is more expensive than buying uncooked rice in bulk or bagged, but it could be an option if you are just starting out on a whole grain...

Brussels Sprouts – fresh

Though I didn’t grow up eating them, I LOVE Brussels Sprouts! My mom did not enjoy them as a child (overcooking them makes the flavor overpowering and the texture mush), so she never prepared them for our family. When done right, they are amazing! (gently steamed until tender or roasted) Sometimes, stores will even sell them still on their...

Bread – Buns – Sprouted

If you buy buns, be sure not to be fooled by “multi-grain” or “wheat” – as they need to be whole grain (or sprouted) to maximize the nutrient content! Cut each bun in half, wrap in plastic, put them back into the bag and keep them in the...

Capers (in brine)

Look for jars of capers in the area near the condiments, pickles, relish, etc. My favorite are from Trader Joe’s. Once opened, keep in the refrigerator (use clean utensils and they will be good for months).

Carrots – Colorful!

Look for colorful carrots at the Farmers’ Market, Trader Joe’s or local supermarket. Find the bunch with the freshest green tops if they are still attached!

Cauliflower – Colorful?!

There are a whole variety of colorful cauliflower now available! Do some taste testing to see which you enjoy the most! Scope out cauliflower at your local Farmers’ Market, too!

Celery (organic when possible)

Whenever possible, buy organic celery, as pesicide residues have been higher than for other veggies (check out this list of fruits and veggies – Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 to help you decide which to buy...

Chiles – Fire Roasted

Canned fire roasted chiles can be found at supermarkets and Trader Joe’s, typically near the salsas and tomato products.

Chili Garlic Sauce

This Chili Garlic Sauce is quite spicy – a little goes a long way! It can be found in with other Asian foods (soy sauce, teriyaki sauce, etc.) in the supermarket.

Chipotle in Adobo

Chipotle peppers are roasted jalapeños and are canned with adobo sauce. The peppers are still whole, with the seeds inside. If you want the smoky pepper flavor without all of the heat, be sure to scrape out the seeds before mincing (finely chopping) the chipotle. Most recipes only call for 1-2 peppers, so you will have plenty leftover, even if you only buy a small can. I like to use the snack or sandwich size zip top bags and freeze one pepper with a few teaspoons of sauce in each per bag. Then, I can thaw out a bag for a recipe (like my Seasoned Black Beans or Sofritas in The Foodie Bar Way) in just a few...

Chocolate Chips

I prefer to use cacao nibs (and cacao/cocoa powder) whenever possible. My husband and kids really like chocolate chips. Look at the ingredient label to make sure that they do not contain any dairy (milk/butter/cream).

Hot Sauce – Cholula

Another one of my son’s favorite varieties of hot sauce… This one does not need to be kept in the refrigerator.

Cacao/Cocoa Powder

While you can buy unsweetened cocoa powder at nearly any grocery store and Trader Joe’s, I use a lot of it, so I buy it online and keep it in the freezer.

Coconut Sugar

While my first choice for sweeteners is fruit, followed by date sugar (dried dates in powder version), and then coconut sugar. Costco sold organic coconut sugar for a while, but now I get it online (can be much less expensive than at the market).

Coconut water

I like to use coconut water for some of my smoothies (see the Smoothie Foodie Bar), so I keep small containers of coconut water in my pantry. Larger containers of coconut water saves on packaging, but once opened, need to be kept in the refrigerator and used within a...

Coconut flakes

If you like big coconut flakes, look for unsweetened organic coconut flakes (you can even make coconut “bacon” with these – find a recipe online!) and keep them in the freezer. They can be used as is or roasted in the oven (keep an eye on them so they don’t...

Coconut shredded

Look for unsweetened organic shredded coconut, if you want small pieces, and keep them in the freezer. They can be used as is or roasted in the oven (keep an eye on them so they don’t burn!).

Corn – frozen – (organic whenever possible)

I always keep several bags of organic frozen corn. It couldn’t be easier than grabbing a bag from the freezer, cutting off one corner, pouring out the amount I need (still frozen) and returning the rest to the freezer. It will be thawed in no time (can also rinse in a colander to speed it up). Currently, corn and soy are going to be the most important items to look for non-GMO. Buying organic corn and soy are makes it easy to avoid GMO since that is one of the requirements related to using the organic...

Cornmeal – whole grain – organic

Whole grain organic cornmeal can be found with the specialty flours/baking products in the supermarket or online (typically the best price). I store all cornmeal (and the rest of my whole grains) in the freezer, since higher temperatures can begin to break down the vulnerable unsaturated fats over time (end up rancid or with little...

Crackers – whole grain, oil-free, gluten-free

Mary’s Gone Crackers are my favorite whole grain crackers, as they are made without oil (very rare) and are suitable for those avoiding gluten. They are amazingly crunchy, which I enjoy and although they can be pricey at the grocery store, they are much more reasonably priced at Costco (esp. when they offer at coupon ~$2.50 off, several times a year). Keep in a cool cabinet (or even the freezer, if space...

Cranberries (frozen)

Cranberries can be purchased either frozen (all year round) or fresh (typically in the produce area around the holidays in Nov/Dec) and put directly into the freezer in their original package (no prep necessary). When you take out the amount you plan to use for a recipe, just rinse them using a sieve or...

Date Sugar

Date sugar is the healthiest sweetener, second only to fruit. It is made by drying dates and them making them into a powder. Once I open a package of date sugar, I store it in the refrigerator. I typically buy it online or at a local health food store, but have seen it at our local supermarket (both options are more expensive). If used in place of sugar in a recipe, it has a thickening effect, so you may need to adjust the recipe a bit by increasing the amount of...

Dates – Medjool

Medjool dates are very plump and sweet, while also being larger than the Delget Noor variety. I typically purchase them at Costco in a plastic tub. I remove the pit and little crown piece (if still on the date), which is easiest when they are still at room temperature, transfer them to a quart size zip-top freezer bag and keep them in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator (lasts for months and months, can also be frozen). Then, they are ready to use and I don’t have to worry about a stray pit that would ruin a recipe (and maybe even my blender if I am making a sauce or...

Plums – dried (a.k.a. Prunes)

Dried plums, formerly known as prunes, are sold in grocery stores and Costco. Once the bag is open, I keep them in the fridge (lower drawer).

Edamame – Ready to Eat

We buy Organic Edamame (ready-to-eat) in the refrigerated area at Costco. I always look for packages with the date furthest in the future. When I get home, I divide up the pods into 3 quart zip-top bags and put two in the freezer, because I know we won’t eat them all during the week, (and I don’t want them to go bad). The smaller bags will easily thaw overnight in the refrigerator. You can also buy frozen edamame (uncooked), just boil for 4-5 minutes before...

Flax seed – whole and ground (at home)

Since flax seed is very stable when whole, but important fatty acids are heat sensitive once ground, I always buy whole flax seed (typically in bulk), at the supermarket. While I store it in the freezer, I grind enough for a week (using a dedicated, $8 coffee grinder) to keep in a glass jar in the refrigerator, for easy access. Health wise, there doesn’t seem to be a difference between brown or golden flax, but in baking, if you are concerned about keeping your recipe light in color, use golden...

Buckwheat flour

Despite it’s name, buckwheat flour is not made from wheat (and is actually gluten free). I like to use it in my Banana Pecan Snack Cake, among other recipes. I keep it in the freezer (with the rest of my whole grains, nuts and seeds). While I have seen it at my local grocery store, with the specialty flours, and sometimes in bulk, I normally buy it...

Whole Wheat Pastry Flour

I don’t use much flour, and like to make my own oat flour whenever possible. On occasion, I will use whole wheat pastry flour. It has a very light texture and can be substituted for white flour in any recipe, likely without anyone noticing. I keep it in the freezer with the rest of my whole grains, flours, nuts and...

Blueberries – frozen

I always keep a bag of frozen organic blueberries on hand. Costco sells a 3 pound bag of these gems in the freezer section. I rarely buy fresh blueberries because they mold so quickly (like between leaving the grocery store and arriving on my kitchen counter!).

Yogurt – non-dairy options

There are several non-dairy yogurt options now available in the dairy case (or “natural foods” refrigerated section) in many supermarkets. Do some taste testing to see which you enjoy the...

Vinegar – Balsamic

Although every supermarket carries balsamic vinegar, my favorite is Kirkland brand (Costco).

Vinegar – Apple Cider

I use apple cider vinegar in a lot of the dressings that I make for myself. I haven’t noticed a big difference in flavor among various brands....

Vegetable Broth – in box

Vegetable broth comes in aseptic containers like the one below (always look for low sodium varieties). I tend to use the refrigerated broth base, but usually have one carton in my pantry. Keep any open cartons in the fridge.

Rainbow Salad

Rainbow Salad – sold by Mann’s -is a cousin to Broccoli Slaw, however includes the addition of cauliflower (broccoli, cauliflower, purple cabbage and carrots). If often goes on sale at my local supermarket for $0.99 and I use it in my Crazy Salad Base, as well as soups, Un-Fried Rice Foodie Bar, stir-fries and...

Bok choy

While some of my students grew up eating bok choy in stir-fries and soups, others have never tasted this wonderful vegetable from the cabbage family. It is super crispy and can be enjoyed raw in a salad or cooked. It is very nutrient dense and provides calcium that is easily absorbed by your...

Beets – fresh and roasted

Beets can be purchased and cooked or enjoyed raw (grated in salad… amazing -better than you think it would be!), or available already cooked and vacuum sealed. Perfect for your Crazy Salad Foodie Bar or the Beet with Citrus recipe in The Foodie Bar Way. For fresh beets, the condition of the greens will let you know how fresh they are. As soon as you get them home, separate the greens from the beet roots and use the greens within a day or so. The beet roots will last for a week or more in a bag (in the crisper drawer of the...

Tortillas – whole grain

Several whole grain tortillas are available. Here are a few of my favorites – the sprouted tortillas will be in the freezer section of the supermarket.  I usually wrap 3-4 in plastic and then put them back into the zip-top bag and store them in the...

Tortillas – Corn (some are sprouted)

Several companies make organic corn tortillas that are available in many supermarkets (even look for store brands). Be sure to look for those with very few ingredients. Sprouted corn tortillas are a great choice, but more expensive, and will almost always be kept in the freezer section because they are made without any preservatives and don’t last long on the grocery store shelves. All tortillas can be kept in the freezer. We love making Mia’s 1-2-3 Easy Tortilla Chips from The Foodie Bar Way....

Tomatillos – fresh

Tomatillos can be found the in produce aisle of many supermarkets, most often with the outer covering (either green or brown – dried). Keep them at room temperature unless cut (then refrigerate). They will be very tart if they are still quite firm.

Tofu – silken

Silken tofu is sold in water or in shelf-stable aseptic boxes (like a juice box), typically in the refrigerated section of the produce aisle. Check the label to ensure that the tofu is made from organic soybeans and the company is not adding any protein isolates. Do not freeze silken tofu (texture will not hold up)....

Tempeh

Trader Joe’s Organic 3 Grain Tempeh is my favorite – an 8 oz package provides 40 grams of protein, is only $1.99 and it freezes perfectly. We make a batch of Austin’s Seasoned Tempeh every other week and enjoy it on sandwiches and in our Crazy Salad Foodie Bar. Many grocery stores carry tempeh in the refrigerated section of the produce aisle, with the tofu, wonton wrappers, miso,...

Hibiscus Tea

Hibiscus tea has an amazing ability to boost the antioxidant level of your blood within minutes! Be sure to make Timaree’s Tropical Splash (recipe in The Foodie Bar Way and on my website – www.TheNutritionProfessor.com) – it couldn’t be easier – no heat needed! Any tea with “hibiscus” as the first ingredient on the label will work – I like the “zinger”...

Sun-dried tomatoes

Many varieties of sun-dried tomatoes are packed in oil, but these are dry and can be re-hydrated or chopped dry and added directly to a dish.

Turmeric – fresh and dried

Turmeric is an amazing root with a huge amount of research detailing the plethora of health benefits. It can be purchased fresh in the produce aisle (look next to the ginger root), or dried in powder form. The fresh root can be frozen.

Poultry Seasoning – dry spice

Poultry seasoning is 100% poultry-free! It is simply a combination of several herbs, namely sage, that give it a characteristic flavor.

Paprika – Smoked – dry spice

Smoked paprika should not be confused with “regular” paprika (bell peppers dried and ground), as the flavors are completely different. Be sure to have smoked paprika on hand, as it is a wonderful addition to many soups, marinades and several recipes in The Foodie Bar...

Nutmeg – whole or ground spice

Nutmeg can be purchased whole and grated with a microplane, or purchased ground. The outside of nutmeg can be ground and is sold as mace.

Curry Powder – dry spice

This is my VERY FAVORITE curry seasoning/powder. Since all curry powders are a blend of several herbs and spice, each taste a little different. This one has a bit of a sweet flavor, while other brands taste bitter to me. If you don’t have a Cost Plus World Market near you, try a variety of curry powders until you find one that you really...

Cumin – ground dry spice

Cumin seeds can be purchased whole (and toasted in a dry pan before grinding for maximum flavor) or ground. If you are not fond of cumin, try ground coriander.

Cloves – ground dry spice

Cloves are an amazingly potent antioxidant able to protect our cells, even when only a pinch is added to a dish!

Cayenne pepper – dry spice

Cayenne pepper certainly packs a punch, so a little bit goes a very long way. Better to add it cautiously, little by little – tasting for heat as you go.

Cardamom – ground

Cardamom seeds, that give Chai blends their characteristic flavor, are grown in little pods as sold whole or ground. The very best price that I have ever seen is at Cost Plus World Market (3x less expensive than the supermarket!

Ancho Chili Powder – dry spice

I buy Ancho Chili Powder in the grocery store (small bags/packets) or at Cost Plus World Market. Depending on the batch, it can bring a bit of heat.

Allspice – dry spice

Allspice is featured in my Chai Spice Blend (in The Foodie Bar Way and on my website www.TheNutritionProfessor.com) and I usually buy it at Cost Plus World Market (best price), but can also be found at the local supermarket and even in bulk at a...

Onion – dried chopped

Dried onion last for months and can easily be added to dressings and soups, especially great for travel…

Chipotle Chili Powder

This Chipotle Chili Powder from Cost Plus World Market is very smoky and spicy – a little goes a very long way! I use it several recipes, including a special one: Austin’s Smoky Spice...

Sesame seeds

Sesame seeds are one of the most nutrient dense sources of calcium! They can be purchased in bulk bins, bagged or in bottles. I keep them in my freezer and use them in a variety of recipes as well as in place of tahini (sesame seed “butter” – expensive). Black sesame seeds are fun to use and typically a bit lower in fat content than white sesame...

Chia seeds

Chia seeds provide protein, fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, are flavorless and have the ability to thicken when stirred/blended with a liquid (in a dressing/sauce, to make a chia “egg”, or in a smoothie). I use them in many recipes They are sold in bulk and bagged and come in black and white varieties (no difference in nutrition – just color). They are very shelf-stable and don’t need to be refrigerated or frozen. They can be used whole or ground, unlike flax, which must be ground (and kept cool) to protect the omega-3 fatty acids and provide an opportunity for your body to access...

Sea vegetables – Seaweed – nori snacks and dulse

Seaweed snacks made from nori are showing up at many stores, from the local supermarket to Costco. Sea vegetables, including “seaweed” are very nutrient rich, especially when it comes to minerals like iodine. Dulse is another type of sea veggie that can be found powdered. Unopened packages should be put into air-tight zip-top bags so they retain their crispy texture. Both impart a “flavor of the sea” to...

Sausage – plant-based, store-bought options

There are several plant-based sausages available in the refrigerated area in the produce aisle at many grocery stores. While I don’t typically eat them (since they include oil), they are a “sometimes food” for my husband and kids, with one link flavoring dinner for all three of them (some of their favorite Pasta Foodie Bar combinations). Be sure to avoid varieties that include “isolated protein” as an ingredient. They freeze very well and Trader Joe’s tends to have the best price....

Aminos (Bragg’s Liquid Aminos and Coconut Aminos)

Bragg’s Liquid Aminos and Coconut Aminos are flavorful sauces that are fun to experiments with. Coconut Aminos has a slightly sweet flavor, but 0 g of sugar, is made from coconut sap and contains ~113 mg of sodium per teaspoon. Bragg’s Liquid Aminos contains 320 mg of sodium per teaspoon. Coconut Aminos can be expensive, with the best price I’ve found...

Soy Sauce or Tamari

I buy “regular” soy sauce or tamari, instead of low-sodium and simply dilute it with water (this is cheaper way to go). Both soy sauce and tamari are made from fermented soy beans, with soy sauce incorporating wheat and tamari made with very little to no wheat (check the label if you have eliminated...

Curry Paste, Red Thai

This is a very taste paste without any scary ingredients! A little goes a long way in a soup or other savory dish. Refrigerate once opened.

Rice – Brown – Jasmin

Since all white rice starts off as brown (in the whole grain version), every variety that you enjoy can be found as brown rice (Jasmin/Basmati, etc.). I keep it in my freezer.  

Chard – Rainbow

This gorgeous rainbow chard was at our local Farmers’ Market, but our local grocery stores carry it as well.

Potatoes – sweet – orange colored flesh

These sweet potatoes are delicious and commonly labeled as “yams” – though true yams are very large roots, can weigh over a hundred of pounds, are white in color, and commonly grown in Africa, Asia or the Caribbean.  If you plan to roast them whole, but have had these orange colored flesh sweet potatoes and thought they were a bit stringy, try the light colored flesh varieties – as their texture is ultra creamy. Enjoy an easy recipe for Baked Sweet Potato Fries from The Foodie Bar Way or my website (www.TheNutritionProfessor.com). Experiment with steaming them for a few minutes (just slightly tender – not fully cooked), before seasoning them and putting them into the oven to get crispy. Keep them in a cool, dark cabinet away from onions until you are ready to use them, checking them daily to make sure they don’t soften and begin to...

Potatoes – Sweet – Light colored flesh

When many people think about sweet potatoes, they might picture a bright orange dish on the Thanksgiving table. However, these sweet potatoes with light colored flesh are VERY creamy when cooked (the orange colored flesh can be a little stringy, and are great when cubed or cut for roasted “fries”). If you haven’t tried them – do so right away! They are the star of our Southwestern Loaded Sweet Potato recipe in The Foodie Bar...

Potatoes – purple

Purple potatoes are bursting with phytonutrients, ready to protect your cells! These are available at our local supermarket, year-round. I will put a few pictures of whole purple sweet potatoes up once I get an opportunity to get to a Farmers’ Market in Sacramento, where I have purchased them in the past. Keep them at room temperature in a dark cabinet (away from onions), until you are ready to use them. The color is...

Pickles – (sandwich slices)

Start looking at ingredient labels when shopping for pickles and you’ll find that nearly all varieties at local supermarkets use food coloring. However, Trader Joe’s organic kosher pickles do not. Keep them in the refrigerator once opened.

Peperoncini

It seems that relish and peperoncini’s are very difficult to find without added food coloring. Mezzetta is a very popular brand and has a “natural” line – called “Jeff’s Naturals” – so food coloring! Yippee!! I believe that I found these at Sprouts (supermarket). Ask your local market to carry them.  Keep refrigerated once...

Peanut Butter

Your peanut butter should have 1-2 ingredients – peanuts (and maybe salt). That is it! No other ingredients are needed! I usually buy peanut butter, at Trader Joe’s (organic if they have it in stock). We like the chunky variety. If you are used to the “no-stir” kind, full of unwanted ingredients, don’t worry – this will only take mixing it initially, then keep it...

Noodles – Shirataki

Shirataki noodles are extremely low in calories and made from either soybeans/tofu or Japanese konjac yam. They are usually sold in a bag filled with water, in the refrigerated area of the produce aisle (with the tofu, wonton wrappers, miso, etc.) and will last unopened for up to a year. They are flavorless, but may have a “fishy” odor when the package is opened. Rinse the noodles well in a strainer or sieve and then dry the noodles by placing them in a dry pan over medium heat until they “squeak.” Then they can be used in a variety of recipes from a fun Pasta Foodie Bar to rice paper rolls (will be in the next Foodie Bar...

Pasta – You have options!

My Pasta Foodie Bar includes many different noodle options – some of which are pictured below: Whole Grain (durum wheat), Edamame & Mung Bean, Edamame, Quinoa & Corn. Also look for noodles made from black beans, chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and lentil. The ingredient list may surprise you… (some only have 1...

Parsley – curly – fresh

I buy the biggest bunch of parsley I can find each week for my Crazy Salad Base (in The Foodie Bar Way or on my website www.TheNutritionProfessor.com). When I get it home from the market, I plunge it into a big bowl of ice water and then remove the large stems and use my salad spinner to remove excess moisture before wrapping it in paper towel and puttin it into a produce bag. Italian parsley (flat leaves) also works in nearly any recipes that calls for parsley. The exception that I can think of is Tabouli (see video of me making it on TV) – I have only made that with curly parsley, as it has a lighter texture when finely chopped than does Italian...

Pine nuts

Unless I find them for a great deal, I only keep a small amount of pine nuts in my freezer (they can be expensive) – use walnuts in their place. (Trader Joe’s also sells pine nuts).

Cashews – raw

I buy raw cashew pieces (they are cheaper than whole cashews in the picture, as this store didn’t offer that option) at Trader Joe’s or at my local supermarket it bulk. Keep them in the freezer. I do not buy nuts that are roasted in oil.

Almonds

When I can’t find local almonds at our Farmers’ Market, I usually purchase them at Trader Joe’s. I store all nuts in the freezer.

Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast is sold in bags, bulk or round containers as flakes or powder (either will work for the recipes in The Foodie Bar Way), at supermarkets like Sprout’s, as well as from online retailers and has a nutty/cheesy flavor. This is not to be confused with active yeast (for bread making) or brewer’s yeast (a byproduct of beer production). Store it at room temperature. This is a MUST HAVE ingredient for making Our Favorite Cheezie Sauce (incredible). Different brands have slightly different flavor profiles, so try different brands, (bulk section makes it easy to buy a small amount), and find the one that you enjoy the...

Almond Butter

I use almond butter (either creamy or chunky) in our Granola Foodie Bar and Scot’s Granola. I either purchase it at Trader Joe’s or Costco for the best price. Keep in refrigerated after opening.

Mustard

My daughter and I love all different types of mustard! There is wonderful research that even just a pinch of mustard powder added to greens can boost the health promoting power! Be sure that you purchase a mustard without any food dyes. Trader Joe’s has quite a selection of very reasonably priced mustards. Once open, keep in the...

Mushrooms – fresh

Fresh mushrooms can be purchased at any grocery store, though I buy a 24 oz container of them at Costco each week for my Garlic Mushrooms (recipe in The Foodie Bar Way) and on my website (www.TheNutritionProfessor.com). When choosing white button mushrooms, always look for the package with the largest mushrooms, (most health-promoting power). If I am lucky enough to find them at Farmers’ Market (see below), then I certainly pick some up. Keep them cool (right into the fridge, not left on counter), to maximize nutrient content.      ...

Molasses

Molasses is a rich source of iron and calcium and I often add include it in my Oatmeal Foodie Bar and on my Pumpkin Oatmeal (www.thenutritionprofessor.com). I keep it in my pantry at room temperature and it lasts for...

Miso – paste (refrigerated)

Miso paste is typically made from fermented soy, but can also be made from other legumes (chickpeas, etc.). While there are different varieties, any will work for the recipes in the book. I usually find in the refrigerated section of the produce area near other related products (tofu, wonton wrappers, shirataki noodles, etc.) Keep it in the refrigerator and it will last for at least a year! You can use it in dressings and several recipes in The Foodie Bar Way, as well as make your own miso soup (will be in my next Foodie Bar cookbook). Be sure to choose organic or non-GMO miso.  ...

Marjoram – dried herb

Marjoram is a dried herb related to Oregano (but with a milder flavor). I typically buy it at Cost Plus World Market, but can also be found at a local supermarket.

Maple Syrup – the real stuff!

Although I prefer to use Date Syrup (see recipe in The Foodie Bar Way) and on my website (www.thenutritionprofessor.com), when I do use maple syrup, I made sure that it is not a “maple flavored imposter” made with coloring and flavor agents. Costco seems to have the best...

Liquid Smoke

I use a few drops of Liquid Smoke in a few recipes. A small bottle will last a VERY long time and does not need to be refrigerated. If you are interested – here is some interesting info/research about liquid...

Lentils – Red Split

Red split lentils are great in the Seasoned Lentils recipe, or in a marinara sauce, as they get very soft and completely lose their shape. Do not use these red split lentils in the Cauliflower Lentil Filling recipe (Nacho Foodie Bar), as the texture (very soft) will disappoint...

Lentils – green – whole

While there are a variety of lentils, these green whole lentils are perfect for the Cauliflower Lentil Filling in The Foodie Bar Way’s Nacho Foodie Bar, because they hold their shape. Do not substitute red split lentils, as the texture (very soft) will disappoint you. Red split lentils are great in the Seasoned Lentils recipe in the cookbook, or in a marinara sauce, as they get very soft and completely lose their...

Jicama – fresh

Jicama is one of my favorite veggies! I love making my Jicama Chips (in The Foodie Bar Way cookbook and on my website – www.TheNutritionProfessor.com) Be sure to peel the skin completely, including the layer underneath the outer peel- texture slightly resembles a light version of the outside of a coconut. The jicama should be very hard and heavy for it’s size. I have never had luck with jicama covered in a waxy coating, so find a grocery store that sells them without any wax. Depending on the weather, whole jicama will typically be ok on the counter for a few days, but as soon as you cut into it, the pieces will need to be kept...

Italian Seasoning – store-bought

Costco started selling larger containers of organic Italian seasoning. Although I typically make my own (recipe in The Foodie Bar Way and on my website www.TheNutritionProfessor.com), this is nice to have on...

Oregano – dried herb

I buy organic oregano at Trader Joe’s or Cost Plus World Market and sprinkle it on my salads, into dressings and in a bunch of other recipes!

Mint – fresh herb

I buy fresh organic mint every week, either at the supermarket, or at Trader Joe’s (if I am planning a trip there). I pop open the containers and am careful to get the best looking leaves, as some have molded in the packages. The organic mint that I have purchased at Trader Joe’s always seems to last longer, esp. when I keep it in the crisper drawer in the garage...

Basil – dried herb

I typically purchase dried basil at either Trader Joe’s or Cost Plus World Market, very reasonably priced, though it is also available at local supermarkets, as well.

Hazelnuts

Hazelnuts (a.k.a. Filberts) can be found bulk at some supermarkets (Sprouts in our area), as well as in one pound bags at Trader Joe’s. Keep them in the freezer, (for longest life: if you have a vacuum sealer – make small packets to store frozen).

Gum for healthy teeth

There are a few brands of gum on the market that do not use scary artificial sweeteners or sugar. These are our favorites: PUR and Xyloburst. We have tried all different flavors, including green tea, and really like...

Mixed Greens – (a.k.a. Salad Greens)

I buy triple washed organic salad greens (16 oz container) every week for my Crazy Salad Base. I am very picky when I choose the container, and every once in a while, I will find leaves that have already started to decay. I will typically throw away a few leaves, but if many are in bad shape, I will return the container and get a replacement. (Yes, this is a hassle, but less frustrating than picking through each leaf and wondering if my lunch salads are going to go bad before I get to enjoy...

Kale – Red (or Purple) – fresh bunch

Kale is also available with purple stems, with the color also integrated into the leaves. Color, especially deep purples, let us know that these greens are full of important phytonutrients that protect our cells. Same procedure with these – rinse to remove any visible soil, soak in ice water bath to remove additional debris, then spin in salad spinner to remove excess moisture before wrapping in paper towel/clean dish cloth and refrigerating in a bag in the crisper drawer.  This type of kale, along with a bunch of lacinato kale, are two key components of my Crazy Salad...

Kale – Lacinato (a.k.a. Dinosaur) – fresh bunch

Lacinato or Dinosaur kale is typically very dark green and the leaves are shaped like large feathers with a very bumpy texture. They are easy to clean and chop and are a staple in my weekly Crazy Salad Base. After they soak in a large bowl of ice cold water, I remove much of the water by ripping the long leaves in half and placing them in my salad spinner. If I am not going to use them right away, I’ll wrap them in paper towel and then into a produce bag in the crisper drawer of the fridge. I do not remove the stem before stacking them up on top of one another on my cutting board and then finely chopping/shredding (goal: confetti...

Edamame – frozen – ready to cook

I buy organic edamame (soy beans) out of their shells for our Un-Fried Rice Foodie Bar. They are ready after being cooked in boiling water for 4-5 minutes.

Peas – frozen

Peas are a great source of protein and an extremely tasty addition to any salad (you’ve might have been missing out all of this time)! I keep several bags of organic peas in the freezer, so I can add them to any recipe on the fly.

Raisins – organic

Costco sells organic raisins (no sugar added) in a box, which contains 2 bags. They are a staple in my husband’s Crazy Lunch Salad!

Pears – organic

Every time I go to Trader Joe’s, I always check to see if they have any bags of organic pears (2 pounds/bag). I let them ripen on the counter until the stem end gives to a little pressure and then I keep them in the bottom drawer of the fridge.

Ginger

Ginger root can be purchased fresh in the produce aisle and kept in the freezer, or powdered in the spice/baking aisle.

Goji Berries – dried

I add goji berries to my Crazy Lunch Salad and Apple, Chia, Goji Oatmeal recipe. They are sold at many grocery stores with the other dried fruit or in the natural foods area. However, I typically buy them online.

Quinoa

Quinoa can be purchased at most grocery stores, in boxes, bags, and in the bulk bins. Costco also sells 4-5 pound bags of uncooked quinoa. I keep the quinoa in the freezer. (Trader Joe’s also sells quinoa.)

Collard Greens – fresh

I can always count on our Farmers’ Market and our local grocery store to have gorgeous, fresh collard greens. These are perfect to steam and use as a wrap!

Kale – Curly – organic

There are several types of kale, this one is called “green curly” kale and is part of my Crazy Salad Base. (Trader Joe’s also carried kale, already chopped, but the pieces aren’t small enough for my salad mix, so I would have to “re-chop” them, but they are perfect for soups or to...

Frozen Greens (Kale and Spinach)

I always have a few bags of organic greens tucked away in my freezer to have ready to add to any recipe! Be sure to check out my tips for using a food processor to chop these greens while still frozen, it makes all of the difference! (Scrambled Tacos… coming to your kitchen soon!) Any brand of organic frozen greens will work (including store...

Pepitas/Pumpkin Seeds

Raw Pumpkin Seeds (also known as Pepitas) – buy in bulk and keep in freezer. Sprouted pepitas are great if you can find them (Costco used to carry them).